Staff Profiles

Staff Photo

Dr Justin Keogh  

BHMS(Hons), BHSc, PhD,

Dr Justin Keogh
Associate Professor
Faculty of Health Sciences and Medicine
Bond University QLD 4229

Associate Professor

Faculty of Health Sciences and Medicine

Office Telephone Number
Within Australia:
From overseas:

7 559 54487
+61 7 559 54487
Closest Fax Number
Within Australia:
From overseas:

7 559 54480
+61 7 559 54480
Building Level: 5
Building: 18. Bond Institute of Health and Sport
Location: Bond University
Professional Biography
Dr Keogh’s is an exercise and sport scientist whose teaching and research spans the areas of biomechanics, motor control and learning as well as strength and conditioning. His research focuses on understanding the acute stresses, and the chronic adaptations resulting from a range of physical activities, particularly resistance training and more recently dance and aquatic exercise.
The older adult research has focused on understanding the causes/correlates of the age-related decline in functional independence and quality of life, the benefits of a variety of physical activities such as resistance training and dancing for improving physical function and quality of life as well as barriers and motives to physical activity.
His consultancy has involved New Zealand Academy of Sport, Paralympics New Zealand as well as a number of older adult active ageing groups. He is also on the Editorial Board of four peer-reviewed journals including the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research and the Journal of Sports Science and Medicine.
Bachelor of Human Movement Studies (Honours) - Southern Cross University, Lismore
Bachelor of Health Science - Griffith University, Gold Coast
- Griffith University, Gold Coast
Professional admission & memberships

International Society of Biomechanics in Sport

National Strength and Conditioning Association

Australian Association of Gerontology

Psycho-oncology Co-operative Research Group

Australian & New Zealand Urogenital and Prostate Cancer Trials Group

Other professional appointments

Board of Directors - International Society of Biomechanics in Sport

Associate Editor - Journal of Cancer Survivorship

Research interests & research expertise

Dr Keogh’s research focuses on understanding the acute stresses, and the chronic adaptations resulting from a range of physical activities for athletic populations and older adults; and older adults’ motives and barriers to continual participation. His sports science research has concentrated on rugby union, powerlifting, sprinting, golf and strongman. His older adult research involves community-dwelling and residential care elders as well as those with chronic conditions especially cancer.

Recent research grants

Univers Foundation (Japan)

Auckland Medical Research Foundation

Cancer Society of New Zealand

Justin Keogh
(Link to personal researcher page)

Recent Publications
  • A brief description of the biomechanics and physiology of a strongman event: The tire flip
  • Psychometric viability of measures of functional performance commonly used for people with dementia: A systematic review of measurement properties.
  • The epidemiology of injuries across the weight-training sports
  • Quality of life effects of androgen deprivation therapy in a prostate cancer cohort in New Zealand: Can we minimize effects using a stratification based on the aldo-keto reductase family 1, member C3 rs12529 gene polymorphism?
  • Evolution of smart devices and human movement apps: Recommendations for use in sports science education and practice
  • The effect of a seven-week exercise program on golf swing performance and musculoskeletal measures
  • General practitioners' views and experiences of counselling for physical activity through the New Zealand Green Prescription program
  • Neuromuscular performance of elite rugby union players and relationships with salivary hormones
  • Characterization of the differences in strength and power between different levels of competition in rugby union athletes
  • Perception and responses to different forms of aqua-based exercise among older adults with osteoarthritis